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10 companies that started in a garage

10 companies that started in a garage

We often wonder where ideas are born and how projects begin. The most influential companies of recent years were born of an idea and the vast majority of them with few economic and human resources. We have collected some examples of how to convert a “garage” idea to an innovative project world leader in their respective fields… We hope you enjoy it!

Facebook – Founder Mark Zuckerberg

Where: in the room of the student residence in Harvard

When: 2004

The history of the implementation of what is currently the world’s largest social network is controversial, mainly due to the legal battle that Mark Zuckerberg has with three colleagues at Harvard who accuse him of stoling their idea. Believe in the version of “Zuck”, that is to say that the social network (launched as ‘www.thefacebook.com’) was prepared in his residence room of the university. Currently, Facebook is the most visited website in the world, the only one to overcome the Google pages, which dominate the first 10 domains. The social network that has already led to a Hollywood movie now has more than 500 million users.

Google – Founders: Larry Page and Sergey Brin

Where: in the garage

When: 1998

Initially, Larry and Sergey called their search engine: BackRub, based on the servers of Stanford University. After receiving the first investments, Larry and Sergey still worked alone, so they settled temporarily in a garage. When they decided to change the name of the BackRub, they chose the name inspired by the word “googol”, Google, a mathematical term for the number 1 followed by 100 zeros. A suitable term not only for the mission of organizing the almost infinite information available on the Internet, but also for the number of results that a Google search generally returns.

Youtube – Founders Chad Hurley, Steve Chen y Jawed Karim

Where: in the PayPal offices

When: 2005

The caption says that the three PayPal employees started working on the YouTube website, as they were having trouble sharing recorded videos at a dinner, although one of the founders already denies the story and says that these “legends” are common tricks for the start of technological ups. In 2005 came to establish YouTube as revolutionary: in February, the trio began to develop the product, which was finally released in December this year, and now have more than three million videos a day. Today, the site has more than two billion visits per day.

Ebay – Founder Pierre Omidyar

Where: In Pierre Omidyar House

When: 1995

Initially, Pierre Omidyar, an Iranian programmer born in France, called his company AuctionWeb. At that time he worked from home, and sold on the internet a laser pointer that did not function and his surprise was that he sold it. When he contacted the buyer, he told him to collect useless pointers, so that he could offer the possibility of users selling everything. The company changed its name to Echo Bay Technology, but the domain echobay.com was already in use, which led the company to shorten the name to eBay. Currently, eBay is the largest online auction site, and a common reference in popular culture, such as the Jay Leno segment “Things we find on eBay”, where the presenter shows strange objects that are in place.

Linkedin – Founder Reid Hoffman

Where: in the room

When: 2003

Officially founded in 2003, the professional social network LinkedIn has begun to operate in the living room of Reid Hoffman. The site was launched on May 5, after five of the founders invited some 350 of their most important contacts to join the network. For this reason, the place was known among its employees as “Cinco de LinkedIn”, a reference to Cinco de Mayo, a Mexican-American holiday celebrated especially in the United States. Currently, LinkedIn is profitable and has more than 50 million users, including executives of virtually every Fortune 500 company.

Dell – Founder Michael Dell

Where: in the dorm room of the University of Texas

When: 1984

Michael Dell is one of those people we can definitely call a “self-made man.” He started making improvements to computers in room 2713 of the University of Texas dormitory and shortly afterwards asked for a sale license to compete for tender for the supply of material from the State of Texas. Relying on the strategy of selling computers directly to customers on demand, all he did was a year Dell would raise enough money to get out of college and buy an office center in North Austin. Today, Dell is among the top 50 Fortune 500 companies and is one of the largest IT companies in the world.

Nike – Founder Phil Knight and Bill Bowerman

Where: in the trunk of Phil’s car

Founded under the name of “Blue Ribbon Sports”, Nike spent its first two years without being able to find a place in any traditional store. The company, in fact, sold its products directly from the door of the baggage car of Phil Knight’s car. Finally, in 1966, the two partners opened the first store and since then they have not stopped growing, especially after the launch of the first brand-name shoes, the Swoosh. In 1978, Blue Ribbon Sports was renamed Nike, a brand that would become one of the absolute symbols of this business.

Apple – Founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

Where: in the garage of Jobs family

When: 1976

Given its popularity with Apple, already known by its many fans know their humble beginnings by heart. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak started working in the garage of Jobs’ parents. Wozniak conducted the technical aspect of the operation with his inventor skills, assembling rustic but innovative plates that were to become one of the bastions of the “personal computer”. Wozniak and Jobs continued to work in the garage until billionaire Mike Markkula decided to invest $ 250,000 in the company, which was no longer a mere partnership between Wozniak and Jobs. This story is already well known that part of a film for television in 1998, “Pirates of Silicon Valley.” But even the film could not foresee the meteoric rise of the company in the first decade of the millennium, especially after the launch of the iPod.

Mattel – Founders Ruth and Elliot Gestor

Where: in the garage of their house in California

When: 1945

The company that became popular for Barbie, took the first steps shortly after the Second World War. The founders were boyfriends Ruth and Elliot Handler, who decided to start the business in the garage of their home in Southern California. Mattel started manufacturing and selling photo frames before starting to use leftover dollhouse materials. It was not long before they realized that making toys was more profitable than frames, which marked the most dramatic change in the company’s history. In 1955, it was another key moment for Mattel, because it began to sponsor a new television show, “The Mickey Mouse Club” with the launch shortly after its most classic product – Barbie. The rest is history.

Hewlett Packard – Founders Bill Hewlett and David Packard

Where: in the garage of a rented house

When: 1939

The garage where, in 1939, Hewlett Packard began is now “famous piece of real estate”, and many consider it the place where “Silicon Valley began” (idea immortalized with the card that HP puts next to Palo Alto’s garage) . In 2004, HP announced that it would fight to restore the garage to its original state as Hewlett and Packard had known when they started the already legendary technology company. The project was completed in December 2005 and the garage is currently one of the most important real estate areas of HP, which until recently surpassed by Samsung, was the largest IT company in the world.

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